In response to Creative Commons

In response to: https://creativecommons.org/2017/06/22/unsplash/ 

Last week, we put together the new Unsplash License to help us combat copycat websites and the problems that our community of contributors has faced because of these websites. (Why did you change from the Creative Commons Zero License?)

With the new Unsplash License we tried to balance ease of use (plain English) with legal clarity (legalese). Some folks in the community are now picking up on some of the items that we didn’t address explicitly in the Unsplash License, which we did purposefully to avoid over-legalese.

To be clear: our intention is that the Unsplash License is sublicensable and non-revocable. In the coming days, we will clarify our Terms to make this even more clear. 

Attribution isn’t required and there are no issues for users who want to reuse the images, unless they plan to recompile the photos to create a competing service (which based on our member-base, is a tiny, tiny fraction of the Unsplash community).

As for the Unsplash API, everyone can access Unsplash photos on a no-attribution basis. Access to the tech via API is not required. But if a company wants to have that integration, we ask that they provide attribution as part of the enhanced access.

We make it very clear that attribution is only required from the API integrators, not the user of the API. There is no ‘depending’. If you download an image on Unsplash or via an Unsplash integration through a third party, it does not require attribution. If you’re an app developer, it requires attribution. 

We don’t obstruct or restrict the API collection. If you know how to use an API and meet the API terms, you can access every photo ever uploaded to Unsplash that hasn’t been removed by the original photographer.

While we are no longer using the CC0 license, the spirit of the Unsplash License remains unchanged. Our aim is to create a license that is as close as possible to CC0 while helping us address copycat sites. We love the values Creative Commons stands for and our aim has always been and is that creativity should be open and those who contribute should be celebrated. We revised the Unsplash License as an improvement toward this mission we’re trying to accomplish. 

Annie SprattMikael